Best Wine Labels

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    20 Best Artistic & Modern Wine Label Design Examples

    Most individuals don’t take enough interest in wine to have a favorite brand they consistently turn to, unlike many other items that are easily recognized by their brands.

    As a result, one of the most vital marketing resources available to wine producers in wine label design. Wine labels are there to attract our attention, with anything from beautiful, contemporary designs to those that inject some fun into an often stuffy sector.

    The flavor, variety, and even the circumstance that a specific bottle of wine is most suited for are all conveyed on wine labels. The target market of the winemaker, whether we’re talking about younger partygoers who want quirky labels or wine specialists who prefer a classic label, is what matters most. They transmit a mood tailored to capture that market.

    There is fierce market competition because there are so many different varieties of wines from so many different places. More than ever, winemakers depend on label and brand design to increase sales. Check out some of the top wine label designs from today.

    Gut Oggau

    The nine wines produced by the Austrian winery Gut Oggau vary in age and flavor. Jung v. Matt was charged with creating the labels and packaging for these wines. They gave each wine a face, a backstory, and a name because, like a person, each wine has a unique personality. I adore this concept! To choose who or which is my favorite personality, I’d love to sample them all.

    Gut Oggau Wine label
    Sequillo wine label

    Sequillo

    As the wines evolve, the labels will now change annually. The logo is the only item that hasn’t changed. All that the cellar represents is encapsulated in its pencil lines, including ongoing work and experiments with new sites, vineyards, soil types, varietals, and aging techniques. The place serves as the winery’s primary and multifaceted departure point. (This is this year’s labels’ primary emphasis.)

    Nocturnalis / Durinalis

    Some of today’s top designers view that short stretch of glass paper when it comes to wine packaging as a blank canvas, a place for both art and communication, a place where a designer may convey a tale to a potential customer of fine wine.

    The distinction between white and red wines can seem like night and day to some wine enthusiasts. Two wines, a Cabernet Sauvignon and a Sauvignon Blanc have packaging designs by designer Marcel Buerkle that reflect the dynamic essence of the fermented grape. His Nocturnalis and Durinalis wine label designs are influenced by the moon, sun, and earth’s motion about them. These labels show their movements over the sky, evoking a sense of awe for what awaits people who pop these corks.

    Nocturnalis / Durinalis
    the quest

    The Quest

    “The Quest wine labels were created for Chalice Bridge Estate, a grower in Margaret River.

    We were asked to suggest a solution for their mid-tier range of wines that would better reflect their desired positioning after working with the client to build their brand strategy.

    We suggested creating a line of high-end wines called The Quest that is modeled after legends about the Knights Templar and the search for the Holy Grail. The idea honors the client’s exclusive collection of wines dubbed The Chalice, which stands for the Holy Grail of winemaking.

    Snake + Herring

    To launch their new wine project at the beginning of 2011, Snake (the winemaker) and Herring (the wine purveyor) contacted brain cells. They set out to build a wine package that would stand out from the competition with a clear goal statement in hand.

    The image on the label shows Snake and Herring scouring the West Australian countryside in a grape balloon seeking wines of the highest caliber. The full-bleed image has a storybook-like touch and is extremely detailed. The top-tier wine label is more elegant and emphasizes the balloon specifically. Two intricate silk screens, colored foil, and high-build varnish are used to decorate the label.

    Snake + herring
    Tucumen

    Tucumen

    The Budeguer family business, a group of immigrants who rose to prominence as big sugar farmers in northern Argentina, has a new wine label called Tucumen. After more than a century, they made their way back to Mendoza, where there are many vines, to start making wine. The name of the brand combines the Argentinean provinces of Mendoza and Tucumán (also known as Sugar Land in Argentina). The artwork aims to reflect the two lands’ diverse traditions, fashions, colors, and textures as being combined in a single object that symbolizes love for their ancestors.

    Delhaize

    Belgian grocery operator Delhaize sells this selection of wines under its “365” brand, which also contains straightforward, cost-effective items for everyday use. The cork is a symbol of humility since it is a lowly object that is frequently utilized as a craft material and as a straightforward, readily manipulated element for playing and creating. It has the appearance of being straightforward and typical of an ordinary product because cork is used. The piece that unifies and personalizes the entire collection is the cap. Each label’s pattern is specific to its country of origin.

    Delhaize
    The Polly Bottles

    The Polly Bottles

    As a parting gift to a beloved mentor, typographic wine bottle labels were created.
    Polly Cantlon, a design historian, commissioned bottles from Mary Faber and Alice Lo.

    In the first, Polly’s personality is depicted using descriptive language and contrasted with the flavor of a silky red wine; in the second, Polly’s many talents are explored typographically through her name’s different forms.

    Meeta Panesar

    The designs of Meeta Panesar’s wine bottles pay homage to Joseph Albers’ paintings and the Op Art movement. With some conceptual wine labels bursting with color and geometric and others featuring tightly wound black-and-white lines, Panesar continued the Op Art tradition. We’d love to see Meeta Panesar’s wine labels commissioned and created, even though they are now just packaged art concepts.

    meetah panesar
    Lunar Vine Wine

    Lunar Vine

    Who better to hire than UK design company DeathByColor when Lunar Vine Wine wanted to add a splash of color to their bottles? These untamed wine bottles were designed by DBC to be as luscious and vibrantly explosive as possible. While this generally conveys the message “these wines taste like soda pop,” we may nonetheless respect the artist’s intent. Shiraz is one of our favorites, so it should come as no surprise that we select it.

    Matsu Organic

    The primary asset of this winery—three generations of experience—is immediately apparent upon the first glimpse of these bottles. The history of Matsu Organic Wine is displayed on the bottles from grandfather to grandson, demonstrating the attention this family has given to its grape over the years. El Pro, El Recio, and El Viejo, three distinct wines from Matsu, are each represented by a separate label.

    Matsu Organic
    Segreto

    Segreto

    Segreto requested a unique design for a limited-release anniversary vintage, and the result was a striking, distinctive hallmark for the brand. The end design was a black bottle with the brand’s logo snaking around the label in a thick, softly written font. If you group three bottles, the name is almost entirely spelled out. You might have been fortunate enough to purchase a bottle (or three) of wine from your wine shop if you were in the right location at the right moment.

    Shefa Profusion

    The Hebrew word “Shefa” means “profusion,” and these wines were given that name because of their young richness. The Shefa Profusion Wines have a distinctly Middle Eastern aesthetic thanks to their abundance of Hebrew iconography and imagery. Even very nothing is known about the liquids inside, the bottles themselves undoubtedly have a hypnotic quality.

    Shefa Profusion
    Boarding Pass Shiraz

    Boarding Pass Shiraz

    The Boarding Pass Shiraz label is one of the most creative theme-based labels in recent years and has become an instant classic. The front label resembles a boarding card in that the trip information has been replaced with facts about the wine. This 2005 Shiraz, which encapsulates the complete feeling of flying in one bottle, has become a huge hit in the world of packaging design.

    Vine Parma

    The Vine Parma Wine design features a plethora of cultural flavors from designer Raya Ivanovskaya. Hieroglyphics, totems, and mysterious language conveying tales of the past are wrapped around this bottle. The fundamental information about the wine, such as a bar code, distribution facts, alcohol concentration, and more, is subtly incorporated into this design. This wine bottle is a piece of art, not just a wine bottle.

    Vine Parma
    The Logan Weemala

    The Logan Weemala

    The Logan Weemala Wine Collection accurately portrays its home country in both name and symbol. The name of the area where these grapes were cultivated, “Weemala,” is an Aboriginal word that means “excellent view.” War Design chose five Weemala-specific birds to represent each of the region’s varietals, giving this collection a face. The finished product is a collection of labels for a fantastic Australian winery that is straightforward, fun, and appealing.

    Paper Boy

    Every digital design once had a paper beginning, right? Why not keep the paper and translate this design literally?

    With recycled paper packaging, this wine label design supports the eco-conscious, on-the-go demographic in a first for the United States.

    paper boy
    Motif Fine Art Wine

    Motif Fine Art

    These vibrant, patterned label designs for Motif wine by Austrian design agency EN GARDE are perfectly suited for the fleeting attention spans of Instagram browsers, continuing a trend toward maximalist design across the board.

    Each of the six bottles, intended to represent a different wine from the Muster Gamlitz winery, has a unique graphic pattern that spans the entire face label. This high-impact design would look great both online and in person.

    Nest of Vipers

    These brilliantly painted wine labels were made by Spanish illustrator and artist CranioDsgn for the Trinchero Family Estates winery in Napa Valley.

    Each bottle makes the most of the aesthetic brilliance of each snake illustration, with each style of wine being identified by a straightforward color shift.

    Nest of Vipers
    Figula Mihály

    Figula Mihály

    Designer Cecilia Pletser carved a semi-circular pattern out of a variety of different labels, altering the layering to create a collage-like effect, to obtain the complicated packaging of this wine bottle.

    Although it may not be the most effective and cost-effective wine label available, it does stand out well on a crowded shelf.

    Make your wine label design count.

    Today’s wine producers are becoming more and more conscious of the importance of wine label design. They depend on the ingenuity and skill of wine label designers to communicate the principles and narrative of the wine brand and to assist customers in accurately anticipating the wine-tasting experience.

    In addition to influencing purchase decisions, the wine label and packaging have an impact on how consumers perceive and assess the product’s quality, both before and after they have tasted the wine. The label must then be able to persuade the wine buyer that they made the right choice by attesting to the wine’s suitability for the occasion.

    The success of we can be greatly influenced by wine label design, together with the appropriate wine label materials and finishes. It is your duty as a wine label designer or wine brand owner to effectively utilize that authority.

    make wine labels count

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